Federal - S 2070

A bill to amend the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, to reauthorize the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert Program, and to promote initiatives that will reduce the risk of injury and death relating to the wandering characteristics of some children with autism.

Introduced

November 2, 2017

Description

A bill to amend the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, to reauthorize the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert Program, and to promote initiatives that will reduce the risk of injury and death relating to the wandering characteristics of some children with autism.

Our Position

Monitoring

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 12

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • Jan. 18, 2018 — Reported to the Senate by the Senate Judiciary Committee and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar. S Rept 115-200Congressional Record p. S298

  • Dec. 22, 2017 — Received in the House and referred to the House Judiciary Committee, the House Education and the Workforce Committee, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee and the House Administration Committee. Congressional Record p. H10424

  • Dec. 21, 2017 — Measure, as amended, passed in the Senate by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S8274

  • Dec. 21, 2017 — McConnell, R-Ky., for Grassley, R-Iowa, amendment no. 1865, adopted by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S8273

  • Dec. 21, 2017 — Senate Judiciary Committee-reported amendment adopted by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. S8273

  • Dec. 21, 2017 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S8271-S8274

  • Dec. 21, 2017 — McConnell, R-Ky. (for Grassley, R-Iowa), amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1865. Congressional Record p. S8265, S8267

  • Dec. 20, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Baldwin, (D-Wis.)
  • Dec. 19, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Gillibrand, (D-N.Y.)
  • Dec. 7, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Donnelly, (D-Ind.)
  • Dec. 4, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Van Hollen, (D-Md.)
  • Dec. 1, 2017 — Reported to the Senate amended and without a written report by the Senate Judiciary Committee and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar. Congressional Record p. S7717

  • Dec. 1, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Feinstein, (D-Calif.)Leahy, (D-Vt.)
  • Nov. 16, 2017 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

    Nov. 16, 2017 — Committee Vote: Alzheimer's and Autism Patient Alert Program — Manager's Amendment
    Grassley, R-Iowa —

    Manager's amendment that would not allow the Government Printing Office to provide a free copy of the Federal Register to a member of Congress or any other federal office unless the member or office requests a copy of a specific issue or the member or office previously requested a Federal Register subscription for printed copies for that year.

    The bill would create regulations on how to administer Federal Register subscriptions.

    The measure would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2018.

    Manager's amendment that would not allow the Government Printing Office to provide a free copy of the Federal Register to a member of Congress or any other federal office unless the member or office requests a copy of a specific issue or the member or office previously requested a Federal Register subscription for printed copies for that year.

    The bill would create regulations on how to administer Federal Register subscriptions.

    The measure would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2018.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Nov. 16, 2017 — Committee Vote: Alzheimer's and Autism Patient Alert Program — Vote to Report

    Authorize new resources to help families locate people with Alzheimer's, autism and other developmental disabilities who wander out of a supervised setting.

    It would reauthorize the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert Program and expand it to include children with developmental disabilities such as autism. It would authorize the Justice Department to provide grants to state and local agencies and nonprofit groups to provide education and training to prevent wandering. It also would rename the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert Program as the Missing Americans Alert Program. The overall program would be authorized for five years, from fiscal 2018 through fiscal 2022 at an annual funding level of $2 million dollars.

    Within the overall program, individual programs eligible for grants could provide prevention and response information, including online training resources and referrals to families or guardians of individuals at risk of wandering. They could also provide education and training to first-responders, school personnel, clinicians and the public in order to increase the safety of wandering individuals and facilitate their rescue and recovery.

    In addition, grants could support programs that provide emergency protocols for school administrators, staff and families or guardians of individuals at risk of wandering, as well as programs that develop communications systems for alerts or information on wandering individuals.

    The bill would authorize DOJ to award grants to health care agencies, state and local law enforcement agencies to implement alert systems and tracking technology programs to find individuals who have wandered.

    The U.S. attorney general would periodically solicit grant applications by posting a request for them in Federal Register or on the DOJ website.

    In awarding grants, the U.S. attorney general would be required to give preference to law enforcement or public safety agencies that work with nonprofit organizations that use person-centered plans minimizing restrictive information and have a direct link to affected individuals and their families.

    Grant recipients would be subject to certain accountability requirements, including annual audits and the exclusion of grantees who have unresolved audit findings for the first two fiscal years.

    Within two years of the bill's enactment and annually thereafter, the U.S. attorney general would be required to report to Congress on the Missing Americans Alert Program, including the number of individuals who benefited from it.

    The measure would require DOJ to establish standards and best practices for use of non-invasive and non-permanent tracking devices to locate wandering individuals. The standards and best practices would have to include procedures to safeguard the privacy of data used by a tracking device so that access is restricted to necessary law enforcement and health agencies, and that collection of the data would be solely for the purpose of preventing injury or death to a patient.

    The measure would establish an investigation process to address incidents of noncompliance by grant recipients as well as the use of a tracking device over the objection of an individual.

    The measure would stipulate that nothing in it should be construed to require that a parent or guardian use a tracking device to monitor the location of a child or adult if the parent or guardian does not believe that such adevice is necessary or in the interest of the individual under supervision.

    As amended, to offset the costs of the measure, the bill would not allow members to get a free copy of the Federal Register unless their office requested a copy of a specific issue or previously requested a Federal Register subscription for printed copies for that year. The measure would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2018.

    Authorize new resources to help families locate people with Alzheimer's, autism and other developmental disabilities who wander out of a supervised setting.

    It would reauthorize the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert Program and expand it to include children with developmental disabilities such as autism. It would authorize the Justice Department to provide grants to state and local agencies and nonprofit groups to provide education and training to prevent wandering. It also would rename the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert Program as the Missing Americans Alert Program. The overall program would be authorized for five years, from fiscal 2018 through fiscal 2022 at an annual funding level of $2 million dollars.

    Within the overall program, individual programs eligible for grants could provide prevention and response information, including online training resources and referrals to families or guardians of individuals at risk of wandering. They could also provide education and training to first-responders, school personnel, clinicians and the public in order to increase the safety of wandering individuals and facilitate their rescue and recovery.

    In addition, grants could support programs that provide emergency protocols for school administrators, staff and families or guardians of individuals at risk of wandering, as well as programs that develop communications systems for alerts or information on wandering individuals.

    The bill would authorize DOJ to award grants to health care agencies, state and local law enforcement agencies to implement alert systems and tracking technology programs to find individuals who have wandered.

    The U.S. attorney general would periodically solicit grant applications by posting a request for them in Federal Register or on the DOJ website.

    In awarding grants, the U.S. attorney general would be required to give preference to law enforcement or public safety agencies that work with nonprofit organizations that use person-centered plans minimizing restrictive information and have a direct link to affected individuals and their families.

    Grant recipients would be subject to certain accountability requirements, including annual audits and the exclusion of grantees who have unresolved audit findings for the first two fiscal years.

    Within two years of the bill's enactment and annually thereafter, the U.S. attorney general would be required to report to Congress on the Missing Americans Alert Program, including the number of individuals who benefited from it.

    The measure would require DOJ to establish standards and best practices for use of non-invasive and non-permanent tracking devices to locate wandering individuals. The standards and best practices would have to include procedures to safeguard the privacy of data used by a tracking device so that access is restricted to necessary law enforcement and health agencies, and that collection of the data would be solely for the purpose of preventing injury or death to a patient.

    The measure would establish an investigation process to address incidents of noncompliance by grant recipients as well as the use of a tracking device over the objection of an individual.

    The measure would stipulate that nothing in it should be construed to require that a parent or guardian use a tracking device to monitor the location of a child or adult if the parent or guardian does not believe that such adevice is necessary or in the interest of the individual under supervision.

    As amended, to offset the costs of the measure, the bill would not allow members to get a free copy of the Federal Register unless their office requested a copy of a specific issue or previously requested a Federal Register subscription for printed copies for that year. The measure would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2018.

    Ordered reported favorably to the full Senate (as amended) by voice vote.
  • Nov. 9, 2017Consideration and markup deferred by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • Nov. 8, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Burr, (R-N.C.)
  • Nov. 8, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Coons, (D-Del.)
  • Nov. 2, 2017 — Original cosponsor(s): 4

    Durbin, (D-Ill.)Schumer, (D-N.Y.)
    Klobuchar, (D-Minn.)Tillis, (R-N.C.)
  • Nov. 2, 2017 — Companion measure, HR 4221, introduced by Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.).

  • Nov. 2, 2017 — Read twice and referred to: Senate Judiciary.Congressional Record p. S7001